Sexual Violence and Harassment Action Plan Act

EMPLOYMENT LEGISLATION 
NEW ONTARIO LAW EXPANDS EMPLOYER DUTIES TO ADDRESS WORKPLACE SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Ontario employers now have a legal duty to create a workplace sexual harassment program and must do so in consultation with worker health and safety representatives.
 
In passing Bill 132, Sexual Violence and Harassment Action Plan Act, the government amends six pieces of legislation to roll out their action plan across the province. 

New employer duties
Specific amendments to the Occupational Health and Safety Act (the Act) add to employers’ existing duties by requiring greater accountability with regard to workplace sexual harassment, including:

  • Developing and maintaining a written program to implement the sexual harassment policy in consultation with the joint health and safety committee or representative. (As a result of feedback from workers and their representatives, this consultation was the one significant change made to Bill 132 as it made its way through to passage.);
  • setting up procedures and measures for workers to report incidents to someone other than their supervisor or employer, if those persons are the alleged harasser;
  • establishing how information obtained during harassment investigations may be disclosed;
  • ensuring investigations are appropriate to the circumstances;
  • communicating, in writing, the results of a harassment investigation to the worker and alleged harasser (if they’re an employee);
  • reviewing, at least annually, the harassment program.

Health and safety advocates welcome the new changes but suggest they fall short of providing workers with needed programs and protection against all types of workplace harassment. Bill 132 defines and specifies a process to address workplace sexual harassment. All other prohibited forms of harassment however do not appear to demand the same level of employer accountability.

According to the Ministry of Labour existing language in the Act is intended to cover all forms of harassment, defining workplace harassment as “engaging in a course of vexatious comment or conduct against a worker in a workplace that is known or ought reasonably to be known to be unwelcome.” As such the existing definition was drafted to cover all 15 prohibited grounds for harassment as set out under Ontario’s Human Rights Code, among them sex, religion and disability. In addition the Ministry says this language prohibits psychological and personal harassment.

With the changes, Ministry of Labour health and safety inspectors have new powers to order sexual harassment investigations, at the expense of the employer, by an impartial, qualified person.

Universities and colleges have additional duties to work with students to adopt campus-wide sexual violence and harassment policies and programs. The government is also committing funds for training front-line workers in health care, education, justice and hospitality sectors to enable them to better identify and respond during high-risk situations.

Issues unaddressed
Restricted access to investigation reports will limit use of that information in prevention efforts. Not deemed to be a health and safety report under the Act, employers are not required to share sexual harassment reports with the joint health and safety committee.

While many other Canadian jurisdictions have also enacted specific working alone regulations Bill 132 fails to address this significant risk factor for workplace violence and harassment, including sexual harassment.

On March 8, International Women’s Day, as Bill 132 received Royal Assent, the Ontario Human Rights Commission also weighed in with a new policy position on gender-specific dress codes. According to the Commission, sexualized and gender-specific dress codes may violate the Ontario Human Rights Code and may make workers more vulnerable to sexual harassment from others in the workplace.

Bill 132 comes into force on September 8, 2016.

Other related resources:

With these changes, Ontario’s Occupational Health and Safety Act places adds to employers’ significant duties for addressing workplace violence and harassment. The Workers Health & Safety Centre (WHSC) offers a three-hour Workplace Violence and Harassment Prevention Training program designed to help workplace parties better understand workplace violence, harassment and bullying and to fully comply with the legal obligations. Be sure to check out WHSC’s compliance checklists for employers and workers and fact sheets on workplace violence, harassment and bullying.

Need information? Check out WHSC Workplace Violence Resources.

*Published by the Workers Health and Safety Centre


Educational Opportunities for Members

Educational Opportunities for Members

Stewards in Action Level I”
Steelworkers Toronto Area Council (STAC)

April 20-22, 2016 | 25 Cecil Street, Lower level

Your Local Union recently voted to send up to ten (10) members to the STAC course “Stewards in Action Leve I”, April 20-22, 2016. More info

If you are interested in attending please contact us by April 4 and include a short statement on your interest and involvement in the Union, as well as your supervisor’s name and email address.

This course is designed for new stewards. It will help participants better understand the role stewards play in not only grievance handling, but also in “building solidarity” in the unit, local and the community.

The course covers:

  • Where steward fits in the union structure
  • How to do effective grievance investigation and use the Fact sheet
  • Different types of grievances and wording or grievances
  • Getting to know the collective agreement
  • Timelines for grievance handling
  • Communicating in the union and with management
  • Mobilizing in the workplace

Labour Community Advocate Training Level I
LABOUR COMMUNITY SERVICES
TORONTO Session: Wednesday evenings, February 24 – May 4 | 6pm – 9pm
Ontario Federation of Labour, 15 Gervais Drive, Toronto

YORK REGION Session: Thursday evenings, February 25 – May 5 | 6pm – 9pm
CUPE 905 HALL, 165 Pony Drive, Newmarket

The Labour Community Advocate Training provides you with:

  • good listening, confidentiality and communication skills
  • how to gather information and referral skills
  • to help members beyond what the collective agreement provides
  • links workers facing workplace, personl or family challenges with appropriate resources in the community 

Topics covered include:

  • Unions and communities working together
  • your community service
  • principles of communication
  • interview and referral
  • stress: cause and impact
  • addictions and dependency
  • understanding violence
  • family law
  • tenant issues
  • labour community advocates and equity
  • linking labour and community

MORE INFO

If you are interested in attending please contact us by February 12, indicate which location you are interested in, and include a short statement on your interest and involvement in the Union.

 

 


Job Evaluation Update 2015

This powerpoint presentation is the latest update on the process of Job Evaluation between Local 1998 and the University:

[embeddoc url=”http://www.usw1998.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Job-Evaluation-Town-Hall.pptx” viewer=”microsoft”]

The Steeldrum Interviews Jennifer Hollett

*Pictured above, from left: Jennifer Hollett, P. C. Choo, Mary-Marta Briones-Bird and Laura Amodio

SD: Jennifer, why the NDP?

JH: That’s a great question. I used to be a TV reporter and producer and I have worked at CBC, City TV and Chum and the work I did was covering the stories of Canadians, whether it was on the economy, the environment, human rights and civil liberties. Seeing what was happening under Stephen Harper and the Conservative government, I started to worry that soon I wouldn’t recognize the Canada that I grew up in.  So I came from a place of asking questions to a place where I hope to find some answers and I picked the NDP because not only do we have the opportunity to form the next government, but it’s a party with a conscience and a party that looks out for people. I think too often people are disconnected from the political process and I’m really proud to be running with Tom Mulcair and the NDP and advocating for a $15 dollar an hour federal minimum wage, $15 dollar a day childcare, repealing bill C-51 and investing in Toronto to make it a city where everyone can make it.

SD: The NDP has always been perceived as the party of big spending yet provincial NDP governments (the Bob Rae government being an exception) had been one of the most fiscally prudent governments in Canadian history with balanced budgets and even budgetary surpluses. Why is it so hard to shake off the negative connotation of the NDP as the party of big spenders?

JH:  The NDP has an excellent track record when it comes to public administration. Tommy Douglas ushered in Medicare while balancing 17 budgets back to back.  The Finance Board has studied all the political parties to find out which party has the best track record when it comes to budgets and fiscal management and it is the NDP.  We have never been in federal government so it is our track record at the provincial level in the various provinces. It’s something we’re really proud of although it’s not necessarily sexy.  Anytime you see the NDP doing well, both the Liberals and the Conservatives would attack us and it is no different this time. What’s been exciting with regards to conversations I’ve been having at doors with voters is people see that here in University-Rosedale, our campaign is focused on infrastructure and supporting services we rely on, whether it is public transit, health care, child care and pensions as well as making sure we have a strong and diverse economy that has training and job opportunities for young people coming out of University and we can do both. We’re the only party right now to release our fiscal framework that shows how we’re going to fund these promises so it’s an exciting time and I think that has some of the other parties worried and that’s usually where attacks come from.

SD: a) Tertiary education has been chronically underfunded for years. Would an NDP government commit to adequately fund tertiary education?

  1. b) Some European countries are providing free university education to all students, including foreign students. Is this something that an NDP government would consider?

JH:  The NDP is committed to making sure that education is affordable and accessible. Tom Mulcair sat down with the Varsity earlier this year to do an interview that shows you the commitment Tom has in being willing to talk about issues that are connected to post-secondary education.  Student issues are election issues.  It is not only the issue of the cost of education but also the debt load that comes as a result. And when they graduate, they face a youth unemployment rate of 17.6%.  I meet youth in our community who have a degree or two and are struggling to find work so there’s a whole list of issues we need to be addressing when we talk about education.

Right now, we’re not in a position to provide free university education.  Fortunately, I went to university in Quebec, as did Tom Mulcair. Quebec has some of the lowest tuition rates across the country so I came out with some student debt but it was quite manageable. I think that’s the direction we need to move in. If students want to get an education, we have to make sure that they can get it, can afford it and don’t come out with record high debts.

SD: The price of housing in downtown Toronto and across the GTA is very high. What is the NDP’s platform with regard to making housing more affordable, especially for low and middle income people?

JH:  Just the other day I was at a community discussion on co-op housing which is an incredible model. I’d like to see more mixed income communities, not just in University-Rosedale but around Toronto. The NDP has a commitment to building more affordable housing.  The challenge right now is – even for myself – how will I ever be able to get into the housing market due to soaring costs of home ownership?  We need to be looking at the growing population of Toronto and making sure that we have housing and infrastructure to support the population but also making sure when we’re developing housing that there is affordable. Coops seem to work and mixed income communities strengthen the neighbourhood so we need to build on that.  The NDP has a history of advocating for housing. It was the Liberal government that scrapped the national housing strategy – something we’ve been calling for years.  I have met with a lot of housing advocates and that’s where they say it starts.  We are the only G7 country right now that doesn’t have a national housing strategy, so we have to get back to making housing a priority at the federal level and coordinating with the other levels of government.

SD: I’ve heard about the $15 dollar an hour minimum wage, can you tell us more about this and how it would be implemented?  What about the objections from the Canadian Federation of Independent Businesses that this is unaffordable to small business?

JH:  It’s really important to realize that with the $15 dollar federal minimum wage, this is where it begins, this isn’t where it ends.  And there’s been incredible work being done on the ground by various minimum wage advocates.  The movement for a living wage must be able to raise the floor on this issue.  The federal minimum wage is for federal employees, but it would also be a signal to the provinces and to other industries on what is possible.  Right now it’s really tough in a city like Toronto to squeak by on minimum wage. I am really proud of to be a member of the NDP and to be campaigning on this issue, we’ve received great support from workers and advocates for workers.  And it has been studied – this is something we can afford to do. I think it’s something where we can’t afford not to do.  As well, I would like to mention that this is part of a larger movement, we saw the recent announcement in New York about fast food workers so these conversations around $15 dollars are happening throughout North America and the federal government should be a part of that.

SD: How can Tom Mulcair commit to so many promises and yet balance the budget? Can raising the corporate tax rates alone make up for the shortfall?

JH:  We are really proud to have released our fiscal framework in advance of the leaders debate on the economy, we’re the only party to do so, so we have clearly laid out our plan for our campaign and how we plan to fund our promises. None of the other parties have done so and yes, it does include raising corporate taxes by 2%. However, this increase is back to the rates that existed when Harper took office. It makes it competitive with other G7 nations and is still lower than what corporations are paying in the United States.  We have received great support.  A lot of people in my community are like ‘yeah that makes sense’ and the details can be found online if you want to look at fiscal frameworks at ndp.ca.  Some people like to crunch the numbers for themselves.

SD: Tom Mulcair has been on record as saying that he would withdraw from the fight against ISIS. Is that a wise move? How can an NDP government protect Canadians and ensure their safety both at home and abroad?

JH:  Well this is a big conversation and concern that Canadians have right now.  The NDP is committed to withdrawing from Iraq and Syria as we want to focus our efforts on something we are traditionally good at here in Canada which is humanitarian assistance.  The conversation we’ve been having for a while now is in regard to refugees, in particular, the Syrian refugee crisis, and our role as Canadians. We are best known as peacekeepers and we can’t take a look at conflict without connecting it to the impact it has on people in communities both in Syria and Iraq and now around the world and here in Canada.  And with regards to the Syrian refugee crisis, we have been calling for welcoming 10,000 Syrian refugees into Canada. This is the number recommended by the United Nations, an additional 9,000 over the next 4 years as well as the Syrian refugee coordinator is taking the cap off private sponsorships, thereby making sure we can fast track those as well.  Unfortunately there is a lot of bureaucratic obstacles and red tape that really prevent us from getting people into Canada.  But I also want to highlight some of the conversations around Bill C-51 which is a law that the NDP was opposed to and is committed to repealing.  Stephen Harper and Justin Trudeau hare both using fear as a campaign tactic as well as government policy. It’s a false choice to suggest to Canadians that we have to choose between security and human rights and freedom. You don’t and we need to make sure we can protect both. I think people can see that with Thomas Mulcair’s principled stance and approach to these issues that what we are doing is well thought out, it stands for who we are as Canadians and it’s how we can assist the situation in Syria and Iraq here in Canada.

SD: Thank you, Jennifer, for your time. We appreciate you coming in to talk to our members through the pages of Steeldrum.


Educational Assistance Provisions

Staff-Appointed Unit

LETTER OF INTENT  – EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE

INTRODUCTION
In keeping with its policy objective to provide staff members with opportunities for personal development and establish a working environment that will encourage them to develop their abilities, the University has designed this practice on Educational Assistance. Its provisions define the extent to which the University will financially assist staff to further their formal education.

TERMS OF REFERENCE 
Qualifying staff members referred to below are those staff who are eligible in terms of University service (described under ELIGIBILITY) and have academic acceptability by the Faculty, School, Centre, etc., from whom the course is to be taken and the approval of the Department Head before beginning the course as described under PROCEDURES.

ELIGIBILITY 
Bargaining unit employees holding administrative staff appointments whether full-time, part-time of twenty-five (25) percent or more, or sessional are eligible. In the case of part-time staff members, for the first three (3) years’ continuous service, the funding is pro-rated in accordance with the part-time appointment.

PROVISIONS

  1. One hundred (100) percent Tuition Waived

Tuition fees are waived for a qualifying staff member taking:

  1.  A University of Toronto degree course, up to and including flex-time PhD Programs and part-time Doctoral studies. For undergraduate courses, the maximum tuition waiver shall be limited to three (3) full courses during the Fall/Winter session, and one (1) full course during the Summer session and reimbursement will be limited to the equivalent general Arts & Science course tuition fee. For Master’s level programmes, flex-time PhD Programs and parttime Doctoral studies the tuition waiver shall be limited to the part-time programme fee or three thousand ($3,000) dollars per academic year, whichever is less. The University will also waive the balance of degree fee, to the lesser of the equivalent remaining programme fee or three thousand ($3,000) dollars per year, so long as the employee has already received a tuition waiver under this policy; or
  2. a University of Toronto course taken as part of the “academic bridging” programme; or
  3. a University of Toronto course taken as a “special student”; or
  4. a diploma or certificate programme offered through Woodsworth College or other University of Toronto academic divisions, for which students are registered as University of Toronto students and receive diploma at Convocation in accordance with the University Policy on Diploma and Certificate Programmes. The maximum tuition waiver shall be limited to three (3) full courses during the Fall/Winter session, and one (1) full course during the summer session and reimbursement will be limited to the equivalent general Arts & Science course tuition fee.
  5. courses offered by the School of Continuing Studies that are work or job related, up to a maximum of five hundred ($500) dollars per course, and personal interest courses for which a taxable benefit is assessed up to a maximum of two hundred and fifty ($250) dollars per course, with a combined maximum six (6) courses per academic year. 59

Courses should be taken outside of normal working hours. However, if the course is not otherwise available, one such course at a time may be taken during normal working hours provided the approval of the Department Head is obtained and alternative work arrangements are made.

2. Fifty (50) percent Tuition Reimbursed 

Fifty (50) percent of tuition fees will be reimbursed to a qualifying staff member who shows successful completion of a job-related course given at a recognized educational institution (other than those in 1. above). Such courses should be taken on the staff member’s own time, after normal working hours and must be either:

  1. Individual skill improvement courses which are related to the staff member’s present job or to jobs in the same field to which the staff member might logically aspire.
  2. Courses of study leading to undergraduate certificates, diplomas or degrees offered at recognized educational institutions. Such courses must either be an asset to the staff member in the performance of his/her present job or directly related to his/her potential career. Individual courses, even though unrelated, will qualify provided they are a part of an eligible certificate, diploma or degree programmes.

University of Toronto Schools (UTS)

LETTER OF INTENT  – EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE

INTRODUCTION
In keeping with its policy objective to establish a working environment that will encourage staff members to develop their abilities, UTS has designed this practice on Educational Assistance. Its provisions define the extent to which UTS will financially assist staff to further their formal education.

TERMS OF REFERENCE 
Qualifying staff members referred to below are those staff who are eligible in terms of service (described under ELIGIBILITY) and have the approval of the Supervisor before beginning the course as described under PROVISIONS.

ELIGIBILITY 
Bargaining unit employees holding administrative staff appointments whether full-time, parttime of twenty-five (25) percent or more or sessional are eligible. In the case of part-time staff members, for the first three (3) years’ continuous service, the funding is prorated in accordance with the part-time appointment.

Term employees are not entitled to educational assistance under this Letter.

Courses should be taken outside of normal working hours. However, if the course is not otherwise available, one such course at a time may be taken during normal working hours provided the approval of the Supervisor is obtained and alternative work arrangements are made.

Tuition Reimbursed 
Seventy five (75) percent of tuition fees to a maximum of $2,000 per year will be reimbursed to a qualifying staff member who shows successful completion of a job-related course given at a recognized educational institution.

Such courses should be taken on the staff member’s own time, after normal working hours and must be either:

  1. Individual skill improvement courses which are related to the staff member’s present job or to jobs in the same field to which the staff member might logically aspire.
  2. Courses of study leading to undergraduate certificates, diplomas or degrees offered at recognized educational institutions. Such courses must either be an asset to the staff member in the performance of his/her present job or directly related to his/her potential career. Individual courses, even though unrelated, will qualify provided they are a part of an eligible certificate, diploma or degree program.

Victoria University Unit

LETTER OF INTENT  – EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE

INTRODUCTION
In keeping with its policy objective to provide staff members with opportunities for personal development and establish a working environment that will encourage them to develop their abilities, the University has designed this practice on Educational Assistance. Its provisions define the extent to which the University will financially assist staff to further their formal education.


TERMS OF REFERENCE

Qualifying staff members referred to below are those staff who are eligible in terms of University service (described under ELIGIBILITY) and have academic acceptability by the Faculty, School, Centre, etc., from whom the course is to be taken and the approval of the Department Head before beginning the course.

ELIGIBILITY
Bargaining unit employees whether full-time, part-time of twenty-five (25) percent or more are eligible. In the case of part-time staff members, the funding is pro-rated in accordance with the part-time appointment.

PROVISIONS
1. One hundred (100) percent Tuition Waived
Tuition fees are waived for a qualifying staff member taking:

(a) a University of Toronto or Ontario Institute for Studies in Education degree course, up to and including the Master’s level, flex-time Ph.D. programs and part-time doctoral studies. For undergraduate courses, the maximum tuition waiver shall be limited to three (3) full courses during the Fall/Winter session, and two (2) full courses during the Summer session and reimbursement will be limited to the equivalent general Arts and Science course tuition fee. For Master’s level programs flex-time Ph.D. programs and part-time doctoral studies, the tuition waiver shall be limited to the part-time program fee or $2,500 per academic year, whichever is less. The University will also waive the balance of degree fee, to the lesser of the equivalent remaining program fee or $ 2,500 per year, so 119 long as the employee has already received a tuition waiver under this policy; or

(b) a University of Toronto course taken as part of the “academic bridging” program; or

(c) a University of Toronto course taken as a “special student”; or

(d) a diploma or certificate program offered through Woodsworth College or other University of Toronto academic divisions, for which students are registered as University of Toronto students and receive diplomas at Convocation in accordance with the University Policy on Diploma and Certificate Programs. The maximum tuition waiver shall be limited to three (3) full courses during the Fall/Winter session, and two (2) full courses during the summer session and reimbursement will be limited to the equivalent general Arts and Science course tuition fee; or

(e) those courses offered by the School of Continuing Studies that are work or job related, up to a maximum of $500 per course, and personal interest courses for which a taxable benefit is assessed up to a maximum of $250 per course, with a combined maximum 6 courses per academic year.
Courses should be taken outside of normal working hours. However, if the course is not otherwise available, one such course at a time may be taken during normal working hours provided the approval of the Department Head is obtained and alternative work arrangements are made. Any modification of hours worked under this arrangement will be paid at straight time (i.e., no overtime).

2. Fifty (50) percent Tuition Reimbursed Fifty
(50) percent of tuition fees will be reimbursed to a qualifying staff member who shows successful completion of a job-related course given at a recognized educational institution (other than those in 1. above). Such courses should be taken on the staff member’s own time, after normal working hours and must be either:

(a) Individual skill improvement courses which are related to the staff member’s present job or to jobs in the same field to which the staff member might logically aspire.

(b) Courses of study leading to undergraduate certificates, diplomas or degrees offered at recognized educational institutions. Such courses must either be an asset to the staff member in the performance of his/her present 121 job or directly related to his/her potential career. Individual courses, even though unrelated, will qualify provided they are a part of an eligible certificate, diploma or degree program.

University of St. Michael’s College Unit

LETTER OF INTENT #4 – EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE
The University agrees that employees in the bargaining unit shall be entitled to the benefits of the Educational Assistance Policy attached hereto.

INTRODUCTION
In keeping with its policy objective to provide staff members with opportunities for personal development and establish a working environment that will encourage them to develop their abilities, the University has designed this practice on Educational Assistance. Its provisions define the extent to which the University will financially assist staff to further their formal education.

TERMS OF REFERENCE
Qualifying staff members referred to below are those staff who are eligible in terms of University service (described under ELIGIBILITY) and have academic acceptability by the Faculty, School, Centre, etc., from whom the course is to be taken and the approval of the Department Head before beginning the course as described under PROCEDURES.

ELIGIBILITY
Bargaining unit employees.

PROVISIONS
1. One hundred (100) percent Tuition Waived
Tuition fees are waived for a qualifying staff member taking:

a) A University of Toronto degree course, up to and including the Master’s level. For undergraduate courses, the maximum tuition waiver shall be limited to three (3) full courses during the Fall/Winter session, and one (1) full course during the summer session and reimbursement will be limited to the equivalent general Arts and Science course tuition fee. For Master’s level programs, the tuition waiver shall be limited to the parttime program fee or $3000. per academic year, whichever is less. The University will also waive the balance of degree fee, to the lesser of the equivalent remaining program fee or $3000. per year, so long as the employee has already received a tuition waiver under this policy; or

b) A University of Toronto course taken as part of the “Academic Bridging” program; or

c) A University of Toronto course taken as a “special student”; or

d) A diploma or certificate program offered through Woodsworth College or other University of Toronto academic divisions, for which students are registered as University of Toronto students and receive diplomas at Convocation in accordance with the University Policy on Diploma and Certificate Programs. The maximum tuition waiver shall be limited to three (3) full courses during the Fall/Winter session, and one (1) full 45 course during the summer session and reimbursement will be limited to the equivalent general Arts and Science course tuition fee.

e) Courses offered by the school of Continuing Studies that are work or job related, up to a maximum of $500. per course, and personal interest courses for which a taxable benefit is assessed up to a maximum of $250. per course, with a combined maximum six (6) courses per academic year.

f) Courses should be taken outside of normal working hours. However, if the course is not otherwise available, one such course at a time may be taken during normal working hours provided the approval of the Department Head is obtained and alternative work arrangements are made.

2. Fifty (50) per cent Tuition Reimbursed
Fifty (50) per cent of tuition fees will be reimbursed to a qualifying staff member who shows successful completion of a job-related course given at a recognized educational institution (other than in 1. above). Such courses should be taken on the staff member’s own time, after normal working hours and must be either:

a) Individual skill improvement courses, which are related to the staff member’s present job or to jobs in the same field to which the staff member might logically aspire.

b) Courses of study leading to undergraduate certificates, diplomas or degrees offered at recognized educational institutions.

c) Such courses must either be an asset to the staff member in the performance of his/her present job or directly related to his/her potential career. Individual courses, even though unrelated, will qualify provided they are a part of an eligible certificate, diploma or degree program.

This Policy is conditional on the University of Toronto continuing to permit access to the employees and their dependants at no cost to the Employer.


FAQs: Your Collective Agreement

Health Care Appointments (article 13:14)

Where an employee cannot schedule a health care appointment outside of the employee’s regular working hours, the employee will give as much advance notice as possible, and will be given time off with pay necessary to attend the appointment. In such cases, the employee will attempt to schedule the appointment so as to minimize disruption to the employee’s work day.

Union Commentary: Personal health care appointments should not be counted as a personal day, a sick day, or a vacation day. It also should not be counted as lieu time (i.e., time you have to make up later). 

*If you are asked to make up time taken to attend healthcare appointments contact us so we can help.

Overtime (Article 24:06)

Overtime must be authorized in writing in advance by an employee’s immediate supervisor.  Whenever practical, all overtime shall be distributed on a voluntary basis and as equitably as possible to the employees who normally perform the work.

Further, each Department shall establish a process for overtime approval in exceptional circumstances where the requirement for overtime arises due to urgent and/or unforeseen events and the employee’s immediate supervisor is unavailable to authorize the overtime.

Childcare Benefit Improved (Appendix C)

*This tip has been re-published at the request of USW1998 members.
As of January 1, 2015, the existing Child Care Benefit Plan has been improved. While members may still claim up to a maximum of $20/day per child, the previous maximum reimbursement cap of $2000 no longer applies.

The annual fund will now be allocated entirely. The University has estimated that for members who previously received $2000, the new reimbursement amount will likely rise to $2300 for child care expenses for each child under the age of 7.

Your collective agreement can be found here.
Want to see your question featured in our Weekly Newsletter? Please email info@usw1998.ca.
*This tip has been re-published at the request of USW1998 members. 

CLARIFICATION:
Please note that previously we erroneously stated the maximum daily claim amount had been increased to $50 per day. This is incorrect: while the maximum reimbursement cap of $2000 no longer applies, the daily maximum claim amount remains at $20 per day.